All posts by Mary Tvedt

Mary Tvedt is a certified diabetes educator and has managed the Diabetes Care Center at Wyoming Medical Center for the past seven years. She has a bachelor's degree in foods and human nutrition with a minor in child development and family science from North Dakota State University. Prior to moving to Wyoming, she was a consultant dietitian for various health programs in rural Montana. Known for her creativity, she enjoys presenting at workshops and health fairs.

New Years Celebration Appetizer: Jean Eppler’s Cranberries Gone Wild Dip

Cranberry dipHere’s a wonderful, unusual dip recipe.  It has the tartness of cranberries, with the zest of jalapeno and cilantro.  It’s an amazing surprise on the appetizer table.  I replaced the 1.5 cups sugar with about 3/4 cup sugar substitute.  I skipped the cream cheese, which lowered the calories considerably. Try it on celery!

Time: 15 minutes prep + 4 hours refrigeration

Ingredients:

12 ounce package fresh cranberries
1 bunch green onions, chopped
1/4 cup cilantro, chopped
1 small jalapeno pepper
1  ¼  cup sugar
¼ heaping teaspoon cumin
2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
Dash kosher salt
2, 8-ounce packages whipped cream cheese (use a mixer to whip the cheese just before serving)
Chips (or veggies such as celery)

 
Directions:

  1. 005Chop cranberries in a food processor.
  2. Cut up your green onion, cilantro and jalapeno pepper into small pieces.
  3. Mix all ingredients (except cream cheese and chips) in a bowl, cover and store in the fridge for at least four hours. The sugar needs some time to soak into the cranberries and break up their bitter taste.
  4. When you are ready to serve, spread cream cheese on a platter.
  5. Pour cranberry mixture over the cream cheese.
  6. Serve with chips, celery or your favorite dippable ingredients.

Per serving (1 tablespoon on 4 chips):
Calories 47, Fat 2 g, Carbohydrate 6 g, Potassium 63 mg

Recipe adapted from Jean Eppler of Fargo, N.D.

Mary TvedtMary Tvedt is a certified diabetes educator and has managed the Diabetes Care Center at Wyoming Medical Center for the past seven years. She has a bachelor’s degree in foods and human nutrition with a minor in child development and family science from North Dakota State University. If you have concerns about diabetes talk to your doctor. To learn more about services at the Diabetes Care Center, call (307) 577-2592. 

Holiday Appetizer: Party Shrimp with Cilantro Dip

The pulse Dec 2013 075

This appetizer is a healthy choice to add a little spice to your holiday celebration. The leftover cilantro dip also goes well with your eggs for breakfast the next morning.

Party Shrimp with Cilantro Dip      

Makes: 16
Serving Size: About 4 shrimp, 1 tablespoon dip
Preparation Time: 20 minutes
Cooking Time: 5 minutes

Ingredients

Cilantro Dip

6                                  garlic cloves, mincedThe pulse Dec 2013 051
3/4       cup                  minced cilantro
1/2       small               green bell pepper, seeded, cored, and diced (about 1/2 cup)
1          teaspoon         ground cumin
1/4       teaspoon         kosher salt
1/4       teaspoon         red pepper flakes
3          tablespoons     red wine vinegar
1/3       cup                  olive oil

Shrimp

The pulse Dec 2013 056

2          pounds              peeled and deveined fresh shrimp, tails on
1          tablespoon      ground cumin
1          tablespoon      sweet paprika
1 1/2    teaspoons        ground coriander
1/2       teaspoon         garlic powder
1/2       teaspoon         hot or mild chili powder
1/2       teaspoon         cayenne pepper
1/4       teaspoon         kosher salt
1/4       teaspoon         ground black pepper
2          tablespoons     vegetable oil

Directions

  1. The pulse Dec 2013 052In a small food processor, mix the garlic, cilantro, green pepper, cumin, salt and red pepper flakes, pausing to scrape the sides. Add the vinegar and oil, and puree until smooth. Spoon the dip into a small serving bowl; set aside (chill in the refrigerator if not serving right away).
  2. In a large bowl, combine the shrimp, cumin, paprika, coriander, garlic powder, chili powder, cayenne pepper, salt and black pepper.
  3. In a large skillet or wok, heat the oil over medium-high heat. Add the shrimp and sauté for 5 to 8 minutes, until the shrimp turn pink and are no longer translucent. If you need to cook the shrimp in two batches, cook them for about 3 to 5 minutes per batch, until the shrimp are pink. Add the shrimp to a serving bowl.
  4. To serve: Spoon 1 Tablespoon dip into each of 16 shot glasses, and place three or four shrimp around the lip of the glass.

Per serving: Calories 120, Fat 7 g (Sat. Fat 0.9 g), Carbohydrate 1 g (Fiber 0 g, Sugars 0 g), Cholesterol 90 mg, Sodium 205 mg, Potassium 150 mg, Protein 13 g, Phosphorus 130 mg Exchanges: Lean Meat 2, Fat 0.5

Recipe adapted from Diabetes Forecast

Mary TvedtMary Tvedt is a certified diabetes educator and has managed the Diabetes Care Center at Wyoming Medical Center for the past seven years. She has a bachelor’s degree in foods and human nutrition with a minor in child development and family science from North Dakota State University. If you have concerns about diabetes talk to your doctor. To learn more about services at the Diabetes Care Center, call (307) 577-2592. 

Holiday Recipe Makeover: Coconut Macaroons

What fun is a hcoconut-macaroonsoliday party without a little something sweet? With just 21 calories per serving, this recipe for coconut macaroons means you don’t have to skip the family cookie exchange.

I modified my mother’s macaroon recipe for this lighter fare.

Remember, the trick to sticking to a healthier eating plan during the holidays is not to avoid your favorite foods. The key is to enjoy them in moderation.

Coconut Macaroons

Ingredients
4 large egg whites
½ tsp. cream of tartar
¼ tsp. salt
1 c. sugar
¾ c. flaked sweetened coconut

Directions
1. Preheat oven to 300 degrees.
2. In a large bowl, beat eggs, cream of tartar and salt with a mixer at high speed until soft peaks form.
3. Add sugar one tablespoon at a time, beating until stiff peaks form.
4. Fold in coconut.
5. Cover baking sheets with parchment paper. Drop coconut mixture by level tablespoons onto baking sheets.
6. Bake for 40 minutes or until dry. Cool on pans on wire racks.

Add Some Zing!
Melt 4 ounces (115 grams) of semi-sweet or bittersweet chocolate with ½-tsp. shortening in the microwave. Let it cool a little and then dip the bottom of your macaroons. Refrigerate for 15 to 30 minutes to let the chocolate harden. This adds 10 calories, 1 gram of fat and 2 carbohydrates to each macaroon.

Makes 54 cookies.

Nutritional information (per cookie): 21 calories, 0 g fat, 0 g protein, 4 g carbohydrates, 17 mg sodium, 0 g fiber

See the below instructional video on how to make these cookies, featuring me and my daughter, Mandy.

Mary TvedtMary Tvedt is a certified diabetes educator and has managed the Diabetes Care Center at Wyoming Medical Center for the past seven years. She has a bachelor’s degree in foods and human nutrition with a minor in child development and family science from North Dakota State University. If you have concerns about diabetes talk to your doctor. To learn more about services at the Diabetes Care Center, call (307) 577-2592. 

Decoding diabetes: 11 easy snack ideas with 200 calories or less

apple-slices-peanut-butter

If you are living with diabetes or have been diagnosed with prediabetes, you’ve likely heard about the virtues of healthful eating and maintaining a healthy weight.

It’s often easier said than done.

Healthful eating takes planning and a well thought out grocery list. It may also mean cutting down – not cutting out – on some of your favorite foods. Don’t deprive yourself.

Aim for three meals and one to two snacks per day. Think of snacks as mini-meals that contribute nutrient-rich foods. You can fit snack calories into your day without over-spending your calorie budget. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics offers the following tips to make snacking work for – not against – your healthful eating plan.

  • Choose nutrient-rich foods from the grains, fruit, vegetable, dairy and protein food groups. Snacks can boost your energy between meals and supply essential vitamins.
  • Snack only when you’re hungry. Skip the urge to nibble when you’re bored, frustrated or stressed. Feed the urge to do something by walking the dog or working in the garden.
  • Keep portion control in mind. Have a single-serve container of yogurt or put a small serving of nuts in a bowl. Eating directly from a multiple-serving package can lead to overeating.
  • Plan snacks ahead of time. Keep a variety of nutritious ready-to-eat supplies on hand, such as whole-grain crackers and low-fat cheese.

Keep it interesting with these 11 snack ideas with 200 calories or less. Get creative by swapping out different fruits, vegetables and grains to give yourself even more options.

  1. One tablespoon peanut butter spread on slices of a medium apple
  2. One cup tomato soup with five whole-grain crackers
  3. Three cups air-popped popcorn sprinkled with three tablespoons grated parmesan cheese
  4. Tri-color veggie snack: 6 baby carrots, 10 sugar snap peas (or green pepper strips), 6 cherry tomatoes and 2 tablespoons reduced-fat ranch dressing for dipping
  5. Small baked potato topped with salsa and 1 ounce low-fat cheese
  6. Toaster waffle topped with ½ cup blueberries and 2 tablespoons low-fat yogurt
  7. Six whole-wheat crackers and one slice low-fat Colby cheese
  8. Fruit smoothie: Blend 1 cup fat-free milk, ½ cup frozen strawberries and ½ a banana
  9.  One 6-inch fl our tortilla with ¼ cup black beans and 2 tablespoons fresh salsa
  10.  Quick-to-fix salad: 2 cups mixed greens with ½ cup mandarin oranges, 1 tablespoon sliced almonds and 2 tablespoons reduced-fat dressing
  11. Mini-sandwich: Whole-grain dinner roll with 1 slice deli turkey, 1 slice low-fat cheese and mustard

Mary TvedtMary Tvedt is a certified diabetes educator and has managed the Diabetes Care Center at Wyoming Medical Center for the past seven years. She has a bachelor’s degree in foods and human nutrition with a minor in child development and family science from North Dakota State University. If you have concerns about diabetes talk to your doctor. To learn more about services at the Diabetes Care Center, call (307) 577-2592. 

Decoding Diabetes is a weekly series focusing on education, prevention and tips for living with the disease. Find it on The Pulse each Thursday. Past stories include:

Dec. 7: Seven steps to prevention

Nov. 22: A case for regular screenings

Nov. 14: What you should know for World Diabetes Day 

Decoding Diabetes: 7 steps to prevention

diabetesprevention

As many as 79 million people in the United States have prediabetes, yet more than 90 percent of them don’t know it. People with pre-diabetes usually have no symptoms, and many who learn about their pre-diabetes think it’s no big deal.

The best way to get your blood sugar into the normal range is with a coordinated plan of healthy nutrition, increased physical activity and lifestyle strategies that support modest weight loss if you are overweight – 5 to 10 percent of your body weight.  Research shows that such a plan reduces diabetes risk even better than using medication.

You may see improvements in glucose levels in as little as three months. If you have pre-diabetes, don’t wait to make lifestyle changes. The window to turn around elevated glucose levels is only three to six years.

You have the power to prevent diabetes. Here are seven ways to get started:

myplate_blue

1. Move more. Get up, get out, and get moving. Try walking, dancing, bike riding, swimming or playing ball with your friends or family. It doesn’t matter what you do as long as you enjoy it. Try different activities so you don’t get bored.

2. Eat the healthy plate way. Focus on eating less and making healthy food choices including dried beans, whole grains,  three to five servings of vegetables and one to two servings of fruit per day. Cut down on fatty and fried foods. Eat the foods you enjoy, just eat less of them.

 3. Lose some weight. Once you start eating less and moving more, you will lose weight. By losing even 10 pounds, you can cut your chances of developing diabetes.

4. Set goals you can meet. Start by making small changes. Try for 15 minutes of activity a day this week.  Add 5 more minutes each week after until you are active 30 minutes a day, 5 days per week. Try to cut 100 calories (or one can of soda) out of your diet each day. Slowly reduce your calories over time and talk to your health care team about your goals.

5. Record your progress. Keep a food and exercise diary. Write down all the calories you eat and drink and the number of minutes you are active. This is one of the best ways to lose weight and keep it off.

6. Get help. You don’t have to prevent diabetes alone. Involve family and friends in your plans and activities. You can help each other move more, eat less and live a healthier life. Active groups in your area can also help, as can your healthcare team.

7. Keep at it. Making even small changes is hard in the beginning. Try adding one new change a week. If you get off track, start again and keep at it.

Know your risk

The American Diabetes Association recommends you be tested for pre-diabetes if:

* You are overweight and 45 years or older
* You are 45 or older and your doctor recommends testing
* You are overweight with a family history of diabetes, high blood pressure, low HDL cholesterol and high triglycerides
* You are a woman who had gestational diabetes and/or gave birth to a baby weighing more than 9 pounds.
* You are of an ethnic group with a high risk of developing diabetes and have discussed the risks with your doctor. Ethnic groups with a higher risk include African American, Native American, Hispanic and Asian.

WMC Diabetes Care Center

If you have diabetes or are at risk of developing it, our nationally recognized Diabetes Care Center can guide you through all types of the disease – type 1, type 2 or gestational. We offer individual sessions or a series of diabetes education classes to help people live with the disease, help with meal planning, glucose monitoring instruction, foot screening and much more striving to reduce the risk of complications from type 2 diabetes.

Wyoming Medical Center’s Diabetes Prevention Program has shown that simple lifestyle changes can decrease the chance of developing diabetes by 58 percent. Our 12-week program can improve blood sugars, reduce weight and decrease or delay the development of type 2 diabetes among those with pre-diabetes.

For more information, call 577-2592 or visit the center’s webpage.

Anyone with pre-diabetes, diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance is welcome. Please contact your physician to coordinate services.

If you feel you are at risk for developing diabetes, we have screening options available. Call our laboratory at 577-2354 or visit our laboratory page to see the health fair and wellness screenings we offer.

 

Mary TvedtMary Tvedt is a certified diabetes educator and has managed the Diabetes Care Center at Wyoming Medical Center for the past seven years. She has a bachelor’s degree in foods and human nutrition with a minor in child development and family science from North Dakota State University. If you have concerns about diabetes talk to your doctor. To learn more about services at the Diabetes Care Center, call (307) 577-2592. 

Decoding Diabetes is a weekly series focusing on education, prevention and tips for living with the disease. Find it on The Pulse each Thursday. Past stories include:

Nov. 22: A case for regular screenings

Nov. 14: What you should know for World Diabetes Day 

Fall Dessert: Pumpkin Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Cookies

Halloween and baking for The Pulse 037

Here’s a great fall recipe.  My daughter and I enjoyed making these on a recent weekend. We found them delicious with 1/2cup versus 3/4 cup brown sugar in the recipe.

Pumpkin-Oatmeal-Chocolate Chip Cookies

Ingredients:
1 cup butter, softened
3/4 cup sugar
1/2 cup packed brown sugar
1 egg
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 cup quick-cooking oats
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 cup canned pumpkin
1-1/2 cups semisweet chocolate chips
 

Directions:

  1. Halloween and baking for The Pulse 025In a bowl, cream butter and sugars until light and fluffy. Beat in egg and vanilla.
  2. Combine the flour, oats, baking soda and cinnamon; stir into creamed mixture alternately with pumpkin.
  3. Fold in chocolate chips.
  4. Drop by tablespoonfuls onto greased baking sheets.
  5. Bake at 350° for 12-13 minutes or until lightly browned. Remove to wire racks to cool.

Yield: 4 dozen.

Recipe adapted from Taste of Home

Decoding Diabetes: What you should know for World Diabetes Day

newdiabetes_IDFAtlasPoster_2012
Infographic by International Diabetes Federation. Click to enlarge.

Today is World Diabetes Day, a campaign by the International Diabetes Federation to raise awareness about a disease affecting 371 million people, including 24.1 million in the United States. Prevalence is growing in every country and a person is diagnosed with diabetes every 17 seconds.

The numbers are striking. According to the American Diabetes Association:

  • 1 in 12 Americans has diabetes
  • 1 in 4 who have it don’t know they have it
  • 1 in 3 Americans are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes in their lifetimes

Why should you care?

You should care because you probably know someone with diabetes, or you will in the not-too-distant future. You should care because diabetes is the leading cause of cardiovascular disease, blindness, kidney failure and lower limb amputation and because more healthcare dollars are spent on it in North America than in any other region of the world. You should care because the percentage of Wyomingites with the disease has almost doubled from 1994 to 2010, from 3.5 percent to 6.6 percent.

Wyoming Medical Center’s diabetes educators see nearly 3,000 patients every year. At our nationally recognized Diabetes Care Center, we help people manage the disease while reducing risk of complications.

World Diabetes Day is celebrated every Nov. 14, but we don’t want the discussion to end here.  Today, The Pulse kicks off a new community-health project, Decoding Diabetes, a series of articles focusing on education, prevention and tips for living with the disease. We will publish the articles here for the next several Thursdays.

If you’d like to see an article on a particular topic, or if you’d like to share your own diabetes story, email The Pulse editor Kristy Bleizeffer at kbleizeffer@WyomingMedicalCenter.org.

For our first installment, we are passing on this great education from the World Diabetes Day campaign.

Risk factors

infographic-risk-factors-600px
Infographic by the World Diabetes Federation. Click to enlarge.

Type 1 diabetes risk factors are not yet known, but a family history has been shown to slightly increase the risk. Type 2 diabetes is often preventable and is linked to several risk factors:

  • Family history of diabetes
  • Overweight
  • Unhealthy diet
  • Physical inactivity
  • Increasing age
  • High blood pressure
  • Ethnicity
  • Impaired Glucose Tolerance (IGT)*
  • History of gestational diabetes
  • Poor nutrition during pregnancy

Signs and symptoms

infographic-warning-signs
Infographic by the World Diabetes Federation. Click to enlarge.

The signs and symptoms are similar for type 1 and type 2 diabetes, but type 1 usually develops suddenly and the symptoms may be more acute. Symptoms for type 2 may be more gradual or mild, making it harder to detect. In either case, there may be no symptoms at all. Diagnosis cannot be made through any internet article, so you’ll need to see your doctor if you suspect diabetes. Some commonly experienced symptoms include:

  • Frequent urination
  • Excessive thirst
  • Increased hunger
  • Weight loss
  • Tiredness
  • Lack of interest and concentration
  • A tingling sensation or numbness in the hands or feet
  • Blurred vision
  • Frequent infections
  • Slow-healing wounds
  • Vomiting and stomach pain (often mistaken as the flu)

 

Mary TvedtMary Tvedt is a certified diabetes educator and has managed the Diabetes Care Center at Wyoming Medical Center for the past seven years. She has a bachelor’s degree in foods and human nutrition with a minor in child development and family science from North Dakota State University. If you have concerns about diabetes talk to your doctor. To learn more about services at the Diabetes Care Center, call (307) 577-2592.

Decoding Diabetes is a weekly series focusing on education, prevention and tips for living with the disease. Find it on The Pulse each Thursday.

Fall Dessert: “Lighter” Pumpkin Roll

finished pumpin roll 003A pumpkin jelly roll dessert, much like the following recipe has been a favorite during the holiday season for many of us with our families as well as at WMC’s annual employee holiday celebration.

I set out to find a lower-calorie version for my family. In her cookbook “Healthy Homestyle Cooking” Emily Tribole featured a healthier version of this recipe.  Tribole lowered the fat by replacing some of the egg yolks with buttermilk, reduced the sugar and used ricotta cheese for texture and sweetness in the filling. 

My taste panel/family did not prefer the ricotta cheese in the filling, so I further experimented and found Greek yogurt to provide the texture and sweetness needed for the recipe. 

“Lighter” Pumpkin Roll

Ingredients:

Pumpkin sponge cake:pumpkin roll ingredients
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon or 2 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice
1/2 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice
1/4 teaspoon ground allspice
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
2 egg yolks
1/3 cup and 1/2 cup sugar
2/3 cup canned pumpkin
3 tablespoons buttermilk or 8 teaspoons milk and 1 teaspoon lemon juice
4 egg whites
non-stick spray
1/4 cup powdered sugar (to sprinkle on towel)

Filling:
6 ounces light cream cheese, at room temperature (NOT fat free)
1/2 cup powdered sugar
6 ounces fat free greek yogurt
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Directions:

Pumpkin sponge cake:

  1. Oct 2013 & water filter 056Preheat oven to 375°F and place oven rack in the center of the oven. Spray a 15 x 10 inch baking pan with non-stick spray; line the bottom of the pan with parchment paper, then spray the parchment paper with non-stick spray.  Set pan aside.
  2. In a small bowl, mix flour, baking powder, baking soda and spices.  Set aside.
  3. Beat the egg yolks in a large bowl, high speed for about 5 minutes, or until thick, pale yellow and fluffy.  Slowly add 1/3 cup sugar.  Beat in vanilla extract and pumpkin puree. Using a spatula, gently fold in the flour mixture.
  4. In another large bowl, beat the egg whites with clean, dry beaters until soft peaks form.  Slowly beat in the ½ cup sugar.  Gently fold the egg white mixture into the pumpkin mixture.
  5. Pour the batter into the prepared pan, evenly spreading the cake batter with a spatula or knife.
  6. Bake about 13 – 15 minutes, or until the cake springs back when lightly touched in the center.
  7. Oct 2013 & water filter 075Sprinkle a clean dish towel with 1/8 cup powdered sugar.
  8. Immediately upon removing the cake from the oven, invert the pumpkin roll onto the powdered dish towel. Carefully remove the parchment paper from the bottom of the cake and sprinkle lightly with remaining 1/8 cup powdered sugar.  Roll the pumpkin roll up with the towel, while it is still hot and pliable. Place on a wire rack to cool.

Filling

  1. Beat cream cheese, yogurt and vanilla extract until light and fluffy. Add the sugar and beat until smooth. Refrigerate at least one hour.

To Assemble:Halloween and baking for The Pulse 041

  1. Unroll the pumpkin roll, spread with filling to within 1/2 inch of edges, and re-roll.
  2. Cover and chill in the fridge for a few hours or overnight.
  3. Just before serving, lightly dust with powdered sugar.

 

pumpkin roll nutrition

The revised recipe is much lower in calories, fat and carbohydrates. The regular recipe is up to 450 calories, 17 grams of fat and up to 50 grams carbohydrate.

Recipe adapted from Healthy Homestyle Cooking, Evelyn Tribole

Quick & healthy treat: Chocolate covered strawberries

Choc covered strawberries 013I received a call from my teenager this afternoon.  “Um, Mom, did I tell you I need to bring cookies or desserts for our meeting tonight? We are having desserts after new member and officer installation.  I need to leave by 6:15 p.m.”

I was not off work, let alone prepared to have treats ready for transport to a meeting.  I thought of past times when I tried to make baked goods at the last minute.  They were not cooled adequately to cut or needed to be transported warm and cut on site.  I did not want to do that again.

I came up with a quick, healthy idea that would need no additional cooling, would travel well and should look terrific for the dessert bar – Chocolate Covered Strawberries. They made a very attractive/festive offering for the group’s dessert bar.  He didn’t bring home leftovers.  The group must have enjoyed them.

Chocolate Covered Strawberries

Ingredients:

6 ounces semisweet chocolate, chopped

2 ounces white chocolate, chopped

1 1/2 pounds strawberries with stems (about 24), washed and dried very well

Directions:
1.  Line a baking sheet with parchment or wax paper.

2.  In a microwave-safe glass bowl, microwave, at 50 percent power, the chocolate, stirring every 30 seconds, until melted and smooth.  It usually melts well in 1 to 1 ½ minutes.

Choc covered strawberries 0083.  Holding a strawberry by the stem end, dip it in the melted chocolate, letting the excess drip off, then transfer to the wax paper.   Repeat with the remaining berries.

4.  Melt the white chocolate in a zippered bag, using the same process as in step 2, mixing every 30 seconds by squeezing the bag.

5.  Cut a small corner off the plastic bag & drizzle the white chocolate over the dipped strawberries.

6.  Set the strawberries aside until the chocolate sets, 15- 30 minutes.

Holiday Weekend Appetizer: Cowboy Caviar

Here’s a great appetizer or camping snack for the holiday weekend. The beans, vegetables and cilantro are not only rich in nutrients and fiber; they add a zing to whatever they are paired with.

For a low fat version of this appetizer, skip the chips and try salsa on raw jicama, carrots, celery or zucchini, sliced thinly like a chip.

Ingredients:

Cowboy Caviar is a great appetizer for Wyoming Cookouts. It’s also low in fat and calories.
Cowboy Caviar is a great appetizer for Wyoming Cookouts. It’s also low in fat and calories.

1 (15.5 ounce) can black beans, drained
1 (15.5 ounce) can black-eyed peas, drained
1 (14.5 ounce) can diced tomatoes, drained
2 cups frozen corn kernels, thawed
1/2 medium onion, chopped
1/4 green bell pepper, finely chopped
1/2 cup chopped pickled jalapeno peppers
1/2 teaspoon garlic salt
1 cup Italian salad dressing (fat free)
3/4 cup chopped cilantro

Directions:

  1. Mix beans, peas, tomatoes, corn, onion, bell pepper, and jalapeno peppers in a large bowl.
  2. Season with garlic salt.
  3. Add dressing and cilantro; toss to coat.
  4. Refrigerate for 20 minutes or until ready to serve.

cowboy caviar_nutrition