Tag Archives: Safe Kids of Central Wyoming

New car seat inspection starting January 2014

On a windy Saturday in January, Safe Kids Central Wyoming held the first free car seat inspection at the new location – White’s Mountain Motors on East Yellowstone Highway. Moving the car seat inspections to White’s Mountain Motors is in alignment with our General Motors sponsor. General Motors has been a national sponsor for Safe Kids USA for over 16 years. The Buckle Up program has grown into the most comprehensive child passenger safety program in the nation. Measurement of the program is lives saved and injuries prevented. Since this program was started the number of deaths has been cut by a third, and the number of injuries have been cut in half today.
Even with the wind howling outside the service area, 10 vehicles showed up for the volunteer child passenger safety technicians to inspect 12 car seats to ensure they were installed correctly. Three car seats/booster seats were changed out to provide the correct equipment to the children that attended the event.

Child Passenger Safety technicians checking a car seat for a parent and child.
Child Passenger Safety technicians checking a car seat for a parent and child.

Safe Kids was very fortunate to have White’s Mountain Motors donate the removal of the old Safe Kids van graphics, along with purchasing and installing the new graphics. The graphics are the new Safe Kids Worldwide logos and decons.

The new van graphics displayed in front of White’s Mountain Motors on Sat. Jan. 11. Nice bright colors, shapes and new logos are apparent.
The new van graphics displayed in front of White’s Mountain Motors on Sat. Jan. 11. Nice bright colors, shapes and new logos are apparent.

Free Car Seat Inspections

Safe kids holds free car seat inspections on the second Saturday of each month from 10 a.m. to noon at Whites Mountain Motors, 2400 E Yellowstone Highway in Casper.

International Walk to School Day

walk to school willard
Casper Fire/EMS and Caper police officers talk with a student as he arrives at Willard Elementary on International Walk to School Day on Wednesday.

Wednesday was International Walk to School Day and WMC’s Safe Kids of Central Wyoming stopped by Willard Elementary and Evansville Elementary schools to teach children about pedestrian safety.

Volunteers gave out Frisbees, rulers, karabiners, tattoos (provided by FedEx) and other prizes whenever children answered questions about pedestrian safety.

Street safety is the responsibility of both pedestrians and drivers. So, please keep an eye out for children as you drive to and from work, mind all school speed zones and look for people crossing the street before turning across an intersection.

walk to school Evansville
Volunteers at Evansville Elementary talk with the students about pedestrian safety on Wednesday.

Car seat inspection leads to national recall

As one of our six certified child passenger safety technicians, Taryn Gallinger ensures babies are safely strapped in before leaving Wyoming Medical Center. But an inspection she did this summer likely helped protect babies far beyond our walls.

In May, an expecting mother walked into The Birth Place looking for help with her infant car seat – something just didn’t seem right. Gallinger, a certified nursing assistant, followed the woman to her car and, sure enough, the seat’s back end wouldn’t click into the base. No matter how many times Gallinger tried, she couldn’t get it to latch.

“That told me that something was definitely wrong,” Gallinger said. If there were an accident, the front latch would hold, but the back end would likely swing forward, slamming into the front seats.

Gallinger warned the woman not to transport her baby in that seat. She offered the woman another seat and suggested she take the defective one to Casper Fire Station No. 3. Perhaps they could help return it and ensure it would not be resold to someone else, Gallinger told her.

A couple of weeks later, Gallinger ran into the woman again at the Birth Place, this time with her new baby. The young mother thanked Gallinger for her help.

It wasn’t just her car seat that was defective, the mother said, but the entire design.   All such car seats were removed from the store’s shelves, and the defect led to a national recall of that model.

Gallinger hopes the story will motivate others to get their car seats inspected.

“That inspection not only protected patients here,” Gallinger said, “but it protected everyone who would have went out and purchased that particular car seat.”

WATCH THIS: Taryn Gallinger presents an infant car seat safety checklist in the below video.  Remember: When in doubt, call Wyoming Medical Center at 577-7904 for a professional car seat inspection.

Car seat safety guide, birth to age 13

Child Passenger Safety Week started Sunday and continues through Sept. 21. It’s a good time to remind readers that car seats are not just for newborns. Crashes are the most prevalent cause of death for children younger than 12.

Wyoming Medical Center ‘s Safe Kids of Central Wyoming program offers these guidelines for choosing a seat for your children:

* Birth – 12 Months
Your child under age 1 should always ride in a rear-facing car seat. There are different types of rear-facing car seats: Infant-only seats can only be used rear-facing. Convertible and 3-in-1 car seats typically have higher height and weight limits for the rear-facing position, allowing you to keep your child rear-facing for a longer period of time.

* 1 – 3 Years
Keep your child rear-facing as long as possible. It’s the best way to keep him or her safe. Your child should remain in a rear-facing car seat until he or she reaches the top height or weight limit allowed by your car seat’s manufacturer. Once your child outgrows the rear-facing car seat, your child is ready to travel in a forward-facing car seat with a harness.

* 4 – 7 Years
Keep your child in a forward-facing car seat with a harness until he or she reaches the top height or weight limit allowed by your car seat’s manufacturer. Once your child outgrows the forward-facing car seat with a harness, it’s time to travel in a booster seat, but still in the back seat.

* 8 – 12 Years
Keep your child in a booster seat until he or she is big enough to fit in a seat belt properly. For a seat belt to fit properly the lap belt must lie snugly across the upper thighs, not the stomach. The shoulder belt should lie snug across the shoulder and chest and not cross the neck or face. Remember: your child should still ride in the back seat because it’s safer there.

* National Seat Check Saturday is 10 a.m. to noon Sept. 21 at White’s Mountain Motors. Come for a free child car seat safety inspection and to check that yours is installed correctly.

* WMC’s Safe Kids of Central Wyoming will install and inspect child safety seats free of charge.  We will also provide infant car seats to parents who cannot afford one. To arrange a check, call Pam Evert, Safe Kids & Safe Communities program director at (307) 577-7904.

Summer of fun: Out and about with WMC

trojan1
At midnight on June 1, WMC and Foundation staffers walked the first laps of the Trojan Trek, a 720-hour long relay hosted by Kelly Walsh High School. This year, the trek donated proceeds to WMC Foundation’s Angels Cancer Care Program which will help provide food, gas cards, wigs and other support to those fighting cancer. WMC volunteers logged 48 hours on the Kelly Walsh track. (Photo by Dan Cepeda Photography)

Beyond providing expert care to every person who walks through our doors, Wyoming Medical Center is committed to fostering the highest level of health and wellness in our community. It’s one of our core values.

From inspecting children’s safety seats to sponsoring the Casper Marathon, we are taking our care to the streets. Look for us in the coming months as we promote a lifetime of health for Natrona County.

And, by all means, come say hello.

wine (48 of 110)
Debbie Reid serves wine in the Wyoming Medical Center Foundation’s Wine with a View on June 8. Money raised from the event went to the foundation’s Angels Cancer Care Program which helps cancer patients in a variety of ways including offering emotional support, financial assistance, wigs, bras, transportation and more. (Dan Cepeda Photography)
Besides sponsoring this healthy community tradition, WMC mans a support station for the Casper Marathon each year. Here, Paula Mongold, medical staff services administrative assistant, passes water to runners even before the sun has fully woken up.
Besides sponsoring this healthy community tradition, WMC mans a support station for the Casper Marathon each year. Here, Paula Mongold, medical staff services administrative assistant, passes water to runners even before the sun has fully woken up. (Dan Cepeda Photography)
wheeler1
Following our mission to bring healthcare to the community, we offer a variety of health-related talks available to clubs and community groups. Here, neurologist Dr. David Wheeler of Wyoming Neurologic Associates talks about stroke awareness to the Golden K Kiwanis Club at the Senior Center. To schedule a talk, call (307) 577-2388. (Dan Cepeda Photography)
Glow Run
Stars weren’t the only things shining July 19 at the Wyoming Medical Center 5K REV3Glow Run/Walk. Racers donned glow sticks and other reflective gear to celebrate the amazing athletes participating in the City of Casper Cowboy Tough Expedition Race – a 400-mile, point-to-point race from Cheyenne to Casper. (Dan Cepeda Photography)
Staffers from the Community Development Office, the WMC Foundation and Emergency Services passed out more than 2,000 Frisbees and 750 pencils at the Central Wyoming Fair and Rodeo parade in July. These girls are two of our happy customers.
Staffers from the Community Development Office, the WMC Foundation and Emergency Services passed out more than 2,000 Frisbees and 750 pencils at the Central Wyoming Fair and Rodeo parade in July. These girls are two of our happy customers.
Nearly 150 children came to the Safe Kids Swim Night on July 17 at Paradise Valley Pool. Besides free swimming, the night included four water-safety stations manned by the City of Casper Recreation life guards.
Nearly 150 children came to the Safe Kids Swim Night on July 17 at Paradise Valley Pool. Besides free swimming, the night included four water-safety stations manned by the City of Casper Recreation life guards.
More than 500 people, including 383 children, attended Safe Kids Day on May 4 at the Casper Recreation Center. Safe Kids of Central Wyoming, a program led by Wyoming Medical Center, handed out safety tips on firearms, booster seats, fire and more. They also handed out helmets, like the one this little girl is trying on.
More than 500 people, including 383 children, attended Safe Kids Day on May 4 at the Casper Recreation Center. Safe Kids of Central Wyoming, a program led by Wyoming Medical Center, handed out safety tips on firearms, booster seats, fire and more. They also handed out helmets, like the one this little girl is trying on.

As mercury rises, remember to check the back seat

104 degrees
The summer temperature inside your car can become deadly.

On July 11, temperatures in Casper reached 98 degrees. Car interiors become ovens at that heat and can cause serious injury or death to children left inside. It can and does happen in Wyoming.

On Aug. 16, 2011, Kaleb Layton Laatsch of Gillette forgot to drop off his 9-month-old son, Gideon, at daycare. Instead, Laatsch drove to work. Gideon was left in the hot pickup for about nine hours. His body temperature was 108 degrees when paramedics arrived.

The bodies of young children heat up three to five times faster than adults, making them particularly susceptible to heatstroke – the leading cause of non-crash, vehicle-related deaths for children. On average, a child dies from heatstroke in a vehicle every 10 days. Safe Kids of Central Wyoming, a program of Wyoming Medical Center, reminds people to ACT to cut the number of deaths and injury to children left in vehicles.

* A: Avoid injury and death by never leaving your child alone in a care, not even for a minute. On an 80-degree day, a car’s interior can reach 99 degrees in 10 minutes and 109 degrees in 20 minutes. Cracking windows has little effect.

Keep your car locked to ensure children don’t climb in on their own and teach children not to play in parked cars.

* C: Create reminders by keeping a teddy bear or other soft object in the child safety seat when it is not in use. Before strapping a child into the seat, move the Teddy bear to the front passenger seat and strap it in as a reminder that you are transporting precious cargo in the back.

Create a reminder calendar on your phone or computer to make sure you dropped your child off at daycare. Ask your daycare provider to call within a few minutes if your child is not dropped off on time.

* T: Take action. If you see a child alone in the car, call 911. Emergency responders are trained to respond to these situations.

Since 1998, more than 550 children in the U.S. have died from heatstroke while unattended in cars. More information is available at www.safekids.org/heatstroke and www.ggweather.com/heat. Safe Kids of Central Wyoming works to prevent unintentional childhood injury, the leading cause of death and disability to children.